JeffreySmithArt


Forsythia and Copper Canister, final
March 8, 2009, 7:24 pm
Filed under: floral, Painting, pastel, Still life | Tags: , , , , ,
Forsythia and Copper Canister, 18x24", pastel on Wallis paper, Jeffrey Smith

Forsythia and Copper Canister, 18x24", pastel on Wallis paper, Jeffrey Smith

I do love reaching the end of a painting! I had such a wonderful working on this piece.  I has been far too long a break from pastel this time, and I’m thrilled to be back at it.

To celebrate my last day in the studio with my forsythia painting up on the easel, I put together a little video.



Forsythia and Copper Canister, update #2
Forsythia And Copper Canister, 18x24", pastel on Wallis paper, Jeffrey Smith

Forsythia And Copper Canister, 18x24", pastel on Wallis paper, Jeffrey Smith

I’ve been digging through my boxes of pastels to find colors that I can use to unify areas of the painting.  To do this, I try to find a color that can be applied to a few different objects. 

An example would be the light blue that I was able to use in the background, the table top, and the green cloth on the left side of the painting.  By repeating strokes of the same color on top of different objects, it help to create a feeling of those different objects being seen under the same light.  In this case, it is cool north light through my studio window.



Forsythia and Copper Canister, work in progress update
Forsythia and Copper Canister, pastel on Wallis paper, 18x24", Jeffrey Smith

Forsythia and Copper Canister, pastel on Wallis paper, 18x24", Jeffrey Smith

I finally got back over to the studio today.  We have been moving from an apartment in the Warehouse District of downtown Minneapolis, to our first house, over in Saint Paul!  I’m thrilled to be living back in Saint Paul, but moving is a lot of work! Every time that I’ve done it, I swear that this is going to be it for a long time, but I think this time, it is going to be it for a long time.

I worked across the whole painting today.  My goals were to

  1. Develop and  correct the drawing, or shapes through out the painting 
  2. Push for a more accurate value relationship. Basically how light or dark is one thing or shape in comparison to the things or shapes that surround it. 

With pastel, I usually add in some “pushed” or exaggerated colors at this stage.  These colors with get subdued as the painting develops further, but the colors influence can be felt.  You can see an example of this with the strong red on the right side of the bowl, or the orange on the folds of the cloth  just to the left of the copper canister.



Forsythia and Copper Canister, work in progress.
February 25, 2009, 7:42 pm
Filed under: floral, Painting, pastel, Still life | Tags: , , , , , , ,
Forsythia and Copper Canister, pastel on Wallis paper, by Jeffrey Smith

Forsythia and Copper Canister, pastel on Wallis paper, by Jeffrey Smith

Today I thought it would be great to have another dose of spring.  I have loved forsythia since I was a kid.  I have some great memories of a forsythia bush that we had in our backyard that you could actually crawl inside of.  It was like being surrounded by sunshine!

This is a work in progress shot of a pastel still life that I started today.  I began with a 18×24″ sheet of museum grade Wallis paper mounted on to a sheet of 4 ply mat board.  I used a large round bistel brush and toned the paper with a very, very thin wash of oil paint.  If you are going to use oil paint as an underpainting, it is important to use a good quality thinner, I use Gamsol by Gamblin. Another must for oil underpainting sucess is to keep the oil paint thin.  It should look and feel a little like tea.  Think watercolor as you are painting.  Let the white of the paper show through for anything white in your set-up

Once the paint had dried, which took very little time because of all the Gamsol, I blocked  in the pastel painting with Nupastels and Rembrants.  Jumping in with pastels, I did a couple rounds just looking at the big pattern of shapes and values to refine the image left by the oil underpainting.  I always like to start with the darks and build up to the lights.